Second Sunday of Lent

The Voice

Lord,
you established a covenant with Abraham
and promised him that his descendants
would outnumber the stars.
You spoke and Abraham listened to your voice.
Throughout your relationship,
there were difficulties and doubts,
which brought confusion and uncertainty to your servant.
We also listen to your voice,
and hear you proclaim “This is my chosen Son, listen to him.”
Allow us to draw near to your Word
especially in our times of doubt and misunderstanding,
so that we may find the clarity and peace
that only your Word can offer.
We ask this through Christ our Lord. Amen.

© 2019 Liturgy Training Publications. 800-933-1800. Written by Mary Heinrich. Scripture texts are from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970, Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC. All rights reserved. Used by permission. Permission to publish granted by the Archdiocese of Chicago, on August 28, 2018.

Sunday, March 17, 2019
My Sacrifice
Today’s Readings: Genesis 15:5–12, 17–18; Psalm 27:1, 7–8, 8–9, 13–14; Philippians 3:17—4:1; Luke 9:28b–36. Abram obeys the Lords commands, and he is blessed. God gave him direction and guided him to a new place. Having chosen Abram, God invites him into a covenant relationship. God both initiates relationships and gives human beings a chance to respond. The ritual described is one of an ancient covenant. With awe of God, Abram enters into the covenant, and God promises Abram numerous descendants and land.
In the Gospel, Jesus chose three disciples to come away with him to the mountain. There, the disciples encounter the glory of God as they see an aspect of Jesus that no one had seen before. Peter wants tents to be made so that he and the others can stay on the mountain, experiencing Jesus’ glory. The Apostle does not understand what he has seen. God is going to call Peter to make a sacrifice. God proclaims, “This is my chosen Son; listen to him.” Does this allow Peter to better understand who Jesus is and who God is calling Peter to be?
When we listen to God and place the will of God first in our life, the reward is more than we can possibly imagine. How are you living as a disciple? Are you listening for the voice of God? During the next week of Lent, focus on what God is calling you to do and be in this moment of sacred history.

© 2019 Liturgy Training Publications. 800-933-1800. Written by Mary Heinrich. Scripture texts are from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970, Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC. All rights reserved. Used by permission. Permission to publish granted by the Archdiocese of Chicago, on August 28, 2018.

This Week at Home

Monday, March 18
Change of Heart
Lent is a time for a change of heart. The Gospel offers concrete examples of how to do this: by not passing judgment on others, by not being critical of others, by living with a forgiving and loving heart. We will be judged in the same manner that we respond to others. Challenge yourself to refrain from negative assessments today. Today’s Readings: Daniel 9:4–10; Psalm 79:8, 9, 11, 13; Luke 6:36–38.

© 2019 Liturgy Training Publications. 800-933-1800. Written by Mary Heinrich. Permission to publish granted by the Archdiocese of Chicago, on August 28, 2018.

Tuesday, March 19
St. Joseph
Today we honor St. Joseph, husband of Mary and foster father of Jesus. In Scripture, Joseph is described as an upright and righteous man. Little detail is given about him, but his actions portrayed his faith. When the angel in his dream tells him to take Mary as his wife, he abandons his plan to divorce her quietly. Obediently, he also names the child Jesus, just as the angel told him. There are times we do not understand the plan God sets before us. Let us pray today to seek God’s will. Today’s Readings: 2 Samuel 7:4–5, 12–14, 16; Psalm 89:2–3, 4–5, 27, 29; Romans 4:13, 16–18, 22; Matthew 1:16, 18–21, 24.

© 2019 Liturgy Training Publications. 800-933-1800. Written by Mary Heinrich. Permission to publish granted by the Archdiocese of Chicago, on August 28, 2018.

Wednesday, March 20
Not to Be Served, but to Serve
The mother of Zebedee’s sons asks that her two boys sit at a place of honor with Jesus, one at his right hand and the other at his left in the Kingdom. The other ten disciples are not pleased with this request. None yet understands that through servanthood, the Kingdom of God is entered. What do you request of God as you go through times of difficulty or sorrow? Today’s Readings: Jeremiah 18:18–20; Psalm 31:5–6, 14, 15–16; Matthew 20:17–28.

© 2019 Liturgy Training Publications. 800-933-1800. Written by Mary Heinrich. Scripture texts are from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970, Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC. All rights reserved. Used by permission. Permission to publish granted by the Archdiocese of Chicago, on August 28, 2018.

Thursday, March 21
The Face of Christ
The parable of the rich man and Lazarus invites us to reflect upon our attitude toward the poor. What can your family do to respond to the needs of the poor in your community? Consider providing a meal for a shelter or serving at a soup kitchen. Reflect with your family following the visit on what they saw and experienced. Discuss how you felt God’s presence during your visit. Ask the family if they saw the face of Christ in any of the guests of this meal. Today’s Readings: Jeremiah 17:5–10; Psalm 1:1–2, 3, 4–6; Luke 16:19–31.

© 2019 Liturgy Training Publications. 800-933-1800. Written by Mary Heinrich. Permission to publish granted by the Archdiocese of Chicago, on August 28, 2018.

Friday, March 22
Reject the Cornerstone
It is easy to stand outside the setting of today’s Gospel and not identify with the characters in this parable. The tenants are portrayed as those who do not listen to the owner. They are shown as disobedient and greedy. During an examination of conscience, consider how you listen to the Word of God. Do you give God glory or only seek your success and reward? Do you worry excessively about money and finances? Have you intentionally done evil to someone? Today’s Readings: Genesis 37:3–4, 12–13, 17–28; Psalm 105:16–17, 18–19, 20–21; Matthew 21:33–43, 45–46.

© 2019 Liturgy Training Publications. 800-933-1800. Written by Mary Heinrich. Scripture texts are from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970, Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC. All rights reserved. Used by permission. Permission to publish granted by the Archdiocese of Chicago, on August 28, 2018.

Saturday, March 23
Joy of the Feast
The parable of the forgiving father is familiar to us. What do we think the younger son was expecting when he arrived home? He had been away from his country, his father’s house, and his family a long time. He did not know what was happening there while he was gone. Upon his return, he experiences the mercy and the love of his Father. The joy of the feast is compromised by the response of the older brother. Do we ever judge our family members in a harsher light? Carry out a random act of kindness in your home today. Today’s Readings: Micah 7:14–15, 18–20; Psalm 103:1–2, 3–4, 9–10, 11–12; Luke 15:1–3, 11–32.

© 2019 Liturgy Training Publications. 800-933-1800. Written by Mary Heinrich. Permission to publish granted by the Archdiocese of Chicago, on August 28, 2018.

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